Shithead

The product of a disorganized mind

Shithead
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asylum-art:

Wang Ruilin Sculptures
website | on Behance
asylum-art:

Wang Ruilin Sculptures
website | on Behance
asylum-art:

Wang Ruilin Sculptures
website | on Behance
asylum-art:

Wang Ruilin Sculptures
website | on Behance
asylum-art:

Wang Ruilin Sculptures
website | on Behance
asylum-art:

Wang Ruilin Sculptures
website | on Behance
asylum-art:

Wang Ruilin Sculptures
website | on Behance
asylum-art:

Wang Ruilin Sculptures
website | on Behance
asylum-art:

Wang Ruilin Sculptures
website | on Behance
asylum-art:

Wang Ruilin Sculptures
website | on Behance
ZoomInfo
A stout little table I finished this morning. Just over 22” tall, I designed it to elevate my commercial router table to proper working height. 

Plywood and 2x4s were scraps left over from previous projects; the 4x4 legs were scavenged from industrial shipping pallets. I planed the legs down about 1/8” to clean them up, sanded the plywood and framing members, and finished with two quick coats of shellac. 
The frame was assembled with intersecting 3-1/2” galvanized decking screws and the top attached with 3/8 lag bolts screwed into the legs. I used forstner bits to rout cavities in the top to ensure the lag head sat 1/32” below the finished top. 
The Bosch table is attached to the top with four 1/4-20 bolts, allowing me to detach it in the future should I (as I plan to anyway) build a horizontal mortiser for my router and allow it to be mounted on the same table. 

The shelf on the bottom allows me to store router bits and the plunge router, freeing up the compartment in the Bosch unit for component storage. 

I’ve been wanting to build this for over a year and it was a fun little project. My shop partner Atticus likes it at least.
A stout little table I finished this morning. Just over 22” tall, I designed it to elevate my commercial router table to proper working height. 

Plywood and 2x4s were scraps left over from previous projects; the 4x4 legs were scavenged from industrial shipping pallets. I planed the legs down about 1/8” to clean them up, sanded the plywood and framing members, and finished with two quick coats of shellac. 
The frame was assembled with intersecting 3-1/2” galvanized decking screws and the top attached with 3/8 lag bolts screwed into the legs. I used forstner bits to rout cavities in the top to ensure the lag head sat 1/32” below the finished top. 
The Bosch table is attached to the top with four 1/4-20 bolts, allowing me to detach it in the future should I (as I plan to anyway) build a horizontal mortiser for my router and allow it to be mounted on the same table. 

The shelf on the bottom allows me to store router bits and the plunge router, freeing up the compartment in the Bosch unit for component storage. 

I’ve been wanting to build this for over a year and it was a fun little project. My shop partner Atticus likes it at least.
A stout little table I finished this morning. Just over 22” tall, I designed it to elevate my commercial router table to proper working height. 

Plywood and 2x4s were scraps left over from previous projects; the 4x4 legs were scavenged from industrial shipping pallets. I planed the legs down about 1/8” to clean them up, sanded the plywood and framing members, and finished with two quick coats of shellac. 
The frame was assembled with intersecting 3-1/2” galvanized decking screws and the top attached with 3/8 lag bolts screwed into the legs. I used forstner bits to rout cavities in the top to ensure the lag head sat 1/32” below the finished top. 
The Bosch table is attached to the top with four 1/4-20 bolts, allowing me to detach it in the future should I (as I plan to anyway) build a horizontal mortiser for my router and allow it to be mounted on the same table. 

The shelf on the bottom allows me to store router bits and the plunge router, freeing up the compartment in the Bosch unit for component storage. 

I’ve been wanting to build this for over a year and it was a fun little project. My shop partner Atticus likes it at least.
A stout little table I finished this morning. Just over 22” tall, I designed it to elevate my commercial router table to proper working height. 

Plywood and 2x4s were scraps left over from previous projects; the 4x4 legs were scavenged from industrial shipping pallets. I planed the legs down about 1/8” to clean them up, sanded the plywood and framing members, and finished with two quick coats of shellac. 
The frame was assembled with intersecting 3-1/2” galvanized decking screws and the top attached with 3/8 lag bolts screwed into the legs. I used forstner bits to rout cavities in the top to ensure the lag head sat 1/32” below the finished top. 
The Bosch table is attached to the top with four 1/4-20 bolts, allowing me to detach it in the future should I (as I plan to anyway) build a horizontal mortiser for my router and allow it to be mounted on the same table. 

The shelf on the bottom allows me to store router bits and the plunge router, freeing up the compartment in the Bosch unit for component storage. 

I’ve been wanting to build this for over a year and it was a fun little project. My shop partner Atticus likes it at least.
A stout little table I finished this morning. Just over 22” tall, I designed it to elevate my commercial router table to proper working height. 

Plywood and 2x4s were scraps left over from previous projects; the 4x4 legs were scavenged from industrial shipping pallets. I planed the legs down about 1/8” to clean them up, sanded the plywood and framing members, and finished with two quick coats of shellac. 
The frame was assembled with intersecting 3-1/2” galvanized decking screws and the top attached with 3/8 lag bolts screwed into the legs. I used forstner bits to rout cavities in the top to ensure the lag head sat 1/32” below the finished top. 
The Bosch table is attached to the top with four 1/4-20 bolts, allowing me to detach it in the future should I (as I plan to anyway) build a horizontal mortiser for my router and allow it to be mounted on the same table. 

The shelf on the bottom allows me to store router bits and the plunge router, freeing up the compartment in the Bosch unit for component storage. 

I’ve been wanting to build this for over a year and it was a fun little project. My shop partner Atticus likes it at least.
A stout little table I finished this morning. Just over 22” tall, I designed it to elevate my commercial router table to proper working height. 

Plywood and 2x4s were scraps left over from previous projects; the 4x4 legs were scavenged from industrial shipping pallets. I planed the legs down about 1/8” to clean them up, sanded the plywood and framing members, and finished with two quick coats of shellac. 
The frame was assembled with intersecting 3-1/2” galvanized decking screws and the top attached with 3/8 lag bolts screwed into the legs. I used forstner bits to rout cavities in the top to ensure the lag head sat 1/32” below the finished top. 
The Bosch table is attached to the top with four 1/4-20 bolts, allowing me to detach it in the future should I (as I plan to anyway) build a horizontal mortiser for my router and allow it to be mounted on the same table. 

The shelf on the bottom allows me to store router bits and the plunge router, freeing up the compartment in the Bosch unit for component storage. 

I’ve been wanting to build this for over a year and it was a fun little project. My shop partner Atticus likes it at least.
A stout little table I finished this morning. Just over 22” tall, I designed it to elevate my commercial router table to proper working height. 

Plywood and 2x4s were scraps left over from previous projects; the 4x4 legs were scavenged from industrial shipping pallets. I planed the legs down about 1/8” to clean them up, sanded the plywood and framing members, and finished with two quick coats of shellac. 
The frame was assembled with intersecting 3-1/2” galvanized decking screws and the top attached with 3/8 lag bolts screwed into the legs. I used forstner bits to rout cavities in the top to ensure the lag head sat 1/32” below the finished top. 
The Bosch table is attached to the top with four 1/4-20 bolts, allowing me to detach it in the future should I (as I plan to anyway) build a horizontal mortiser for my router and allow it to be mounted on the same table. 

The shelf on the bottom allows me to store router bits and the plunge router, freeing up the compartment in the Bosch unit for component storage. 

I’ve been wanting to build this for over a year and it was a fun little project. My shop partner Atticus likes it at least.
A stout little table I finished this morning. Just over 22” tall, I designed it to elevate my commercial router table to proper working height. 

Plywood and 2x4s were scraps left over from previous projects; the 4x4 legs were scavenged from industrial shipping pallets. I planed the legs down about 1/8” to clean them up, sanded the plywood and framing members, and finished with two quick coats of shellac. 
The frame was assembled with intersecting 3-1/2” galvanized decking screws and the top attached with 3/8 lag bolts screwed into the legs. I used forstner bits to rout cavities in the top to ensure the lag head sat 1/32” below the finished top. 
The Bosch table is attached to the top with four 1/4-20 bolts, allowing me to detach it in the future should I (as I plan to anyway) build a horizontal mortiser for my router and allow it to be mounted on the same table. 

The shelf on the bottom allows me to store router bits and the plunge router, freeing up the compartment in the Bosch unit for component storage. 

I’ve been wanting to build this for over a year and it was a fun little project. My shop partner Atticus likes it at least.
A stout little table I finished this morning. Just over 22” tall, I designed it to elevate my commercial router table to proper working height. 

Plywood and 2x4s were scraps left over from previous projects; the 4x4 legs were scavenged from industrial shipping pallets. I planed the legs down about 1/8” to clean them up, sanded the plywood and framing members, and finished with two quick coats of shellac. 
The frame was assembled with intersecting 3-1/2” galvanized decking screws and the top attached with 3/8 lag bolts screwed into the legs. I used forstner bits to rout cavities in the top to ensure the lag head sat 1/32” below the finished top. 
The Bosch table is attached to the top with four 1/4-20 bolts, allowing me to detach it in the future should I (as I plan to anyway) build a horizontal mortiser for my router and allow it to be mounted on the same table. 

The shelf on the bottom allows me to store router bits and the plunge router, freeing up the compartment in the Bosch unit for component storage. 

I’ve been wanting to build this for over a year and it was a fun little project. My shop partner Atticus likes it at least.
artsyrabbits:

Nyam- Osoryn Tsultem
Ensemble of the Clouds
1977
aneleh:

Peter Rotter
Ancient Chinese Proverb
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sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr
Shop
sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr
Shop
sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr
Shop
sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr
Shop
sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr
Shop
sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr
Shop
sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr
Shop
sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr
Shop
sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr
Shop
sosuperawesome:

Gemma Correll, on Tumblr
Shop
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mossyelf:

phiife:

this eases the entire fuck out of my mind.

Goodnight
mossyelf:

phiife:

this eases the entire fuck out of my mind.

Goodnight
peachnaked:

❤️❤️❤️
givingblowjobs:

smallrooms:

1 bedroom apartment floorplan

this is all i need
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foresity:



Roman Nose Lake || Justin Mullet
foresity:



Roman Nose Lake || Justin Mullet
foresity:



Roman Nose Lake || Justin Mullet
foresity:



Roman Nose Lake || Justin Mullet
foresity:



Roman Nose Lake || Justin Mullet
foresity:



Roman Nose Lake || Justin Mullet
foresity:



Roman Nose Lake || Justin Mullet
foresity:



Roman Nose Lake || Justin Mullet